Article 5B: Street Design

Street Design

Specifications

Designs should permit comfortable use of the street by motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Pavement widths, design speeds, and the number of motor travel lanes should be minimized to enhance safety for motorists and non-motorists alike. The specific design of any given street must consider the building types which have frontage and the relationship of the street to the overall town street network. The following specifications apply to street design:

a. Street trees and sidewalks are required on both sides of public streets except rural roads, lanes, alleys, and the undeveloped edge of neighborhood parkways except that sidewalks may be permitted on only one side of the street to accommodate low impact design in the Rural district. Planting area for street trees should be a minimum of 7 feet in width and sidewalks shall at a minimum be 5 feet in width unless otherwise provided. On Commercial Town Streets, sidewalks should be a minimum of 7 feet in width. A 10 feet minimum width sidewalk with tree grates or cut-outs is encouraged on Commercial Town Streets. Generally, canopy trees shall be planted at a spacing not to exceed 40 feet on center. Where overhead utility lines preclude the use of canopy trees, small maturing trees may be substituted, planted 30 feet on center.

b. On-street parking is recommended where building type and use will generate regular parking use. Occasional on-street parking can be accommodated without additional pavement width. For streets which serve workplace and storefront buildings, on-street parking lane(s) are required and should be marked as such. An on-street parking lane on at least one side of the street is recommended on streets serving apartments, attached houses, and detached houses with lots 60 feet or less in width. On-street parking must also be provided on one side of any street adjacent to a square, park or other Urban Open Space. Parallel on-street parking width is 7 feet to 8 feet. On-street parking should be parallel; angled parking is only permitted as an intentional design element along the main street(s) of the retail center in a planned mixed-use development.

c. Design speeds should not exceed 30 miles per hour on any neighborhood street. Only arterials and town boulevards may exceed this design speed.

d. Traffic control plans showing signage and pavement markings shall be prepared in accordance with the guidance of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. The developer is responsible for the initial installation of the devices or markings and the maintenance thereof until the public accepts the street for maintenance.

The following illustrations present typical examples of ways in which town street cross-sections can be assembled. Lane measurements represent the width of travel lanes; add 1 1/2 or 2 1/2 feet for standard curb and gutter or 2 feet for valley curb and gutter where curb drainage is required.

These specifications may be varied only in accordance with the design principles detailed above and as approved by the Planning Director in consultation with the consulting engineer or transportation.

Street geometries for the sections illustrated on the opposite page are listed below:

Metric
Boulevard
 Design Speed
 35 mph
 Min. Centerline Radius
 To be determined
 Pavement Width
 62'
 ROW width
 86' plus curb and gutter width
 Curb Radius
 15'
 Drainage
 Curb


Metric
Commercial Town Street
 Design Speed
 25 to 30 mph
 Min. Centerline Radius
 165' to 195'
 Pavement Width
 44'
 ROW Width
 74' plus curb and gutter width
 Curb Radius
 15'
 Drainage
 Curb

            

Metric
Residential Town Street
 Design Speed
 25 to 30 mph
 Min. Centerline Radius
 165' to 195'
 Pavement Width
 44'
 ROW Width
 68' plus curb and gutter width
 Curb Radius
 15'
 Drainage
 Curb

Street Design Specifications

Boulevard

Comercial Town Street

Residential Town StreetNeighborhood Center StreetNeighborhood ParkwayNeighborhood StreetLane Specifications


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