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ARTICLE 4: Lot and Building Types

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Building and Lot Types


ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR URBAN WORKPLACE

Lot Type/Urban Workplace

Building Placement/Parking/
Vehicle Access
Encroachment/Pedestrian Access to Building
   
1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within the zone represented by the hatched area. In most cases, the build to line will range from 0’ to 15’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as topography, pattern of lot widths, or setbacks of existing buildings permit a larger setback.

2. Building facades shall be generally parallel to frontage property lines. The façade shall be determined by the massing of the building.

3. Parking shall be located primarily to the rear of the building; sideyard parking shall occupy no more than 35% of the primary frontage line and shall not be placed in any sideyard abutting an intersecting street. Where dimensions of existing lots restrict parking behind buildings, the limitations on sideyard parking may be modified.

4. Points of permitted access to the parking indicated by arrows.

5. Hedges, garden walls, or fences may be built on property lines or as the continuation of building walls. A garden wall, fence, or hedge (min. 3’ in height) shall be installed along any street frontage adjacent to parking areas.

6. Parking areas on adjacent lots shall be connected wherever practical.

7. Trash containers shall be located in a rear parking area (see Parking Regulations) and shall be screened from the right-of -way.

8. Mechanical and utility equipment at ground level shall be placed in the side or rear yard and shall be screened from view by opaque screening from grade level along any public street or adjacent property(Article 7.6.2). Buildings that front on more than one public street may have mechanical and utility equipment located within a street facing yard, provided it is visually screened using compatible building materials and design as the principle structure. This is applicable only where no other reasonable option exists as determined by the Administrator. Examples of features limiting the
location of mechanical and utility equipment may include, but not
limited to, the physical layout of existing building, the presence of
easements, elevation changes, etc.

9. Building facades at street frontage lines shall be pedestrian oriented and of pedestrian scale.
 1. Balconies, bay windows, arcades, porches at an upper level and their supports at ground level, together with awnings above head height (min. 7’-6”) are permitted within the sidewalk as shown by the hatched area. Encroaching arcades should cover entire sidewalk.

2. Primary pedestrian access into the building shall be from the street frontage line (indicated by larger arrow). Secondary access may be from parking areas (indicated by smaller arrow).

Description:
The workplace building may be a large structure (15,000+ square feet) and may have a single use/tenant. Office, industrial, and commercial tenants are typical. Southern mill villages often provide examples of how these buildings can reasonably coexist with other businesses and homes. Locke Mill Plaza, in Concord, provides a good example with its placement at the end of prestigious Union Street. These buildings are critical to the town as employment centers and commercial service locations. The buildings will provide space for industry, large offices, as well as hotels, conference facilities, and large retail uses such as a full service grocery store. Where possible, structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood.

Special Conditions:
1. Buildings in all locations should relate the principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street.

2. Corners: Setback at street corners will generally replicate frontage conditions. Side setbacks on a minor street may be less than the front dimension.

3. Within the limits described, front and side setbacks will vary depending upon site conditions. Setbacks should be used in a manner which encourage pedestrian activity. For example, squares or spatially defined plazas within building setback areas can act as focal points for pedestrians.

Building Type / Urban Workplace

 Permitted Height and Uses  Architectural Standards
 
1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves or the highest level of a flat roof.

2. The height of parapet walls may vary depending upon the need to screen mechanical equipment.

3. Building height to the ridge may vary depending on the roof pitch.

4. Permitted uses are indicated above, and are further controlled by zoning district standards.

 Principles
A. To perpetuate the unique building character of the town and its environs, and to re-establish its local identity, development shall generally employ building types that are compatible to the historic architectural vocabulary of the area in their massing and external treatment.

B. Building elevations fronting or visible from public streets shall be clad with masonry, wood, vinyl siding, stucco, or similar material. Metal paneling may not comprise a street fronting building face.

C. The front elevations facing the street, and the overall massing shall communicate an emphasis on the human scale and the pedestrian environment.

D. Each building should be designed to form part of a larger composition of the area in which it is situated. Adjacent buildings should thus be of similar scale, height, and configuration.

E. Trailers (mobile units) may not be used as permanent workplace buildings.

Configurations
A. Two wall materials may be combined horizontally on one facade. The “heavier” material should be below and can cover the first floor only (i.e. brick below wood siding).

B. Street level windows shall be untinted. Tinted glass with a minimum visual transmittance factor of 35 is permitted. Mirrored or reflective glass is not permitted in ay location.

C. Windows shall be of square or vertical proportion. Special windows may be circular or regular polygons.

Techniques
A. Windows should be set to the inside of the building face wall.

B. All rooftop equipment shall be enclosed in a building material that matches the structure or is visually compatible with the structure.
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ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR SHOPFRONT BUILDING

Lot Type / Shopfront Building

 Building Placement/Parking/Vehicular Access  Encroachment/Pedestrian Access to Building
   
 1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within the zone represented by the hatched area. In most cases, the build to line will range from 0’ to 15’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as topography, pattern of lot widths, or setbacks of existing buildings permit a larger setback.

2. Building facades shall be generally parallel to frontage property lines.

3. Parking shall be located to the rear of the building; sideyard parking shall occupy no more than 25 percent of the primary frontage line and shall not be placed in an established sideyard abutting an intersecting street. Where dimensions of existing lots restrict parking behind buildings, the limitations on sideyard parking may be modified.

4. Points of permitted access to the parking indicated by arrows.

5. Hedges, garden walls, or fences may be built on property lines or as the continuation of building walls. A garden wall, fence, or hedge (min. 3’ in height) shall be installed along any street frontage adjacent to parking areas.

6. Parking areas on adjacent lots shall be connected wherever practicable.

7. Trash containers shall be located in a rear parking area (see Parking Regulations).

8. Mechanical and utility equipment at ground level shall be placed in the side or rear yard and shall be screened from view by opaque screening from grade level along any public street or adjacent property (Article 7.6.2). Buildings that front on more than one public street may have mechanical and utility equipment located within a street facing yard, provided it is visually screened using compatible building materials and design as the principle structure. This is applicable only where no other reasonable option exists as determined by the Administrator. Examples of features limiting the
location of mechanical and utility equipment may include, but not
limited to, the physical layout of existing building, the presence of
easements, elevation changes, etc.
 1. Balconies, bay windows, arcades, porches at an upper level and their supports at ground level, together with awnings above head height are permitted within the sidewalk as shown by the hatched area. Encroaching arcades should cover entire sidewalk.

2. Primary pedestrian access into the building shall be from the street frontage line (indicated by larger arrow). Secondary access may be from parking areas (indicated by smaller arrow).

Special Conditions:
1. The intention of buildings in all locations must be to relate the principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street.

2. Drive-through customer services, if permitted in the district, must be located at the rear of the building or on a side which does not abut a street.

3. Corners: Setbacks at street corners will generally replicate frontage conditions. However, side setbacks on a minor street may be less than the front dimension.

4. Within the limits described, front and side setbacks will vary depending upon site conditions. Setbacks should be used in a manner which encourages pedestrian activity. Squares or spatially defined plazas within building setback areas can act as focal points for pedestrians.

Description:
The shopfront building is a small-scale structure which can accommodate a variety of uses. The structure is typically a maximum of 15,000 square feet. A group of shopfront buildings can be combined to form a mixed-use neighborhood center. Individual shopfront buildings can be used to provide some commercial service, such as a convenience food store, in close proximity to homes. Traditional commercial buildings in the old town provide good examples. Hotels, inns, and conference centers may be placed in shopfront or mixed-use buildings. Where possible, structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood.



Building Type / Shopfront Building

 Permitted Height and Uses  Architectural Standards
 
1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves or the highest level of a flat roof.

2. The height of parapet walls may vary depending upon the need to screen mechanical equipment.

3. Building height to the ridge may vary depending on the roof pitch.

4. Permitted uses are indicated above, and are further controlled by district regulations.

5. Where an existing residential building converts to a mixed-use building, at least 40% of the habitable floors area shall be residential.
 Principles
A. To perpetuate the unique building character of the town and its environs, and to re-establish its local identity, development shall generally employ building types that are sympathetic to the historic architectural vocabulary of the area in their massing and external materials.

B. Building elevations fronting or visible from public streets shall be clad with masonry, wood, vinyl siding, stucco, or similar material. Metal paneling may not comprise a street fronting building face.

C. The front elevations facing the street, and the overall massing shall communicate emphasis on the human scale and the pedestrian environment.

D. Each building should be designed to form part of a larger composition of the area in which it is situated. Adjacent buildings should thus be of similar scale, height, and configuration.

E. Trailers (mobile units) may not be used as permanent shopfront buildings.

Configurations

A. Two wall materials may be combined horizontally on one facade. The “heavier” material should be below and can cover the first floor only (i.e. brick below wood siding).

B. Street level windows should be untinted. Tinted glass with a minimum visual transmittance factor of 35 is permitted. Mirrored or reflective glass is not permitted in any location.

C. Windows shall be of square or vertical proportion. Special windows may be circular or regular polygons.



Techniques



A. Windows should be set to the inside of the building face wall.



B. All rooftop equipment shall be enclosed in a building material that matches the structure or is visually compatible with the structure.

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ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL

Lot Type / Highway Commercial

 Building Placement/Parking/Vehicle Access  Vehicular Circulation/Pedestrian Access
   
 1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within zone represented by the hatched area. In most cases, the build to line will be 15’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as topography, pattern of lot widths, or setbacks of existing buildings permit a larger setback.

2. Setbacks may vary according to setting within limits indicated.

3. Building facades shall be generally parallel to frontage property lines.

4. Parking shall be located to the rear and/or side of the building. Except in the VS District, sideyard parking may occupy no more than 45% of the principle frontage line. In the VS District, sideyard parking may occupy 50% of the principal frontage line. Parking shall not be placed in any sideyard abutting an intersecting street. Where dimensions of existing lots restrict parking behind buildings, the limitations on sideyard parking may be modified.

5. Points of permitted access to the parking indicated by arrows.

6. Hedges, garden walls, or fences may be built on property lines or as the continuation of building walls. A garden wall, fence, or hedge (min. 3’ in height) shall be installed along any street frontage adjacent to parking areas.

7. Parking areas on adjacent lots shall be connected wherever practicable.

8. Trash containers shall be located in a rear parking area (see Parking Regulations).

9. Mechanical and utility equipment at ground level shall be placed in the side or rear yard and shall be screened from view by opaque screening from grade level along any public street or adjacent property (Article 7.6.2). Buildings that front on more than one public street may have mechanical and utility equipment located within a street facing yard, provided it is visually screened using compatible building materials and design as the principle structure. This is applicable only where no other reasonable option exists as determined by the Administrator. Examples of features limiting the location of mechanical and utility equipment may include, but not
limited to, the physical layout of existing building, the presence of
easements, elevation changes, etc.
 1. Main pedestrian access to the building may be from the side (indicated by the larger arrows). Secondary access must be from the street frontage (indicated by the smaller arrow).

2. Drive-throughs shall be located to the rear of the building.

3. Entrance canopies (for motels, etc.) shall face the street.

4. Typical vehicular circulation movement is indicated by thin line arrows.

Special Conditions:
1. Buildings in all locations should relate a principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street.

2. Corners: Setback at street corners will generally replicate frontage conditions.


Description:
This building type generally comprises fast food retail, drive through banks, motels and other highway dependent uses. These regulations are designed to bring these building types into a framework of town streets. This building type shall be limited to the Highway Commercial, Campus Business, and Special Purpose Districts. Where possible, structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood.

Building Type / Highway Commercial

 Permitted Height and Uses  Architectural Standards
 

1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves or the highest level of a flat roof.

2. The height of parapet walls may vary depending upon the need to screen mechanical equipment.

3. Building height to the ridge may vary depending on the roof pitch.

4. Permitted uses are indicated above, and are further controlled by zoning district standards.
 Principles
A. Building elevations fronting or visible from public streets shall be clad with masonry, wood, vinyl siding, stucco, or similar material. Metal paneling may not comprise a street fronting building face.  Decorative metal panels such as Aluminum Composite Material (ACM) panels may be used as an accent or trim material and as cladding for building accent elements such as canopies and their supporting structure.  Decorative metal panel accents however, may no exceed 30% of any facade visible from the street.

B. All walls not visible from a public right-of-way may be constructed of cinder block, bricks, wood or vinyl siding, or approved metal paneling but shall be painted to match the overall color scheme of the rest of the building.

C. Trailers (mobile units) may not be used as permanent highway commercial buildings.



 Configurations
A. Two wall materials may be combined horizontally on one façade. The “heavier” material should be below (i.e. brick below wood siding).

B. Street level windows should be untinted. Tinted glass with a minimum visual transmittance factor of 35 is permitted. Mirrored or reflective glass is not permitted in any location.

 Techniques
A. All rooftop equipment shall be enclosed in a building material that matches the structure or is visually compatible with the structure.


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ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR APARTMENT BUILDING

Lot Type / Apartment Building

 Building Placement/Parking/Vehicle Access  Encroachment/Pedestrian Access
   
 1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within the zone represented within the hatched area.

2. In most cases, the build to line will be 15’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as topography, pattern of lot widths, or setbacks of existing buildings permit a larger setback. In urban conditions, apartments may be set up to the property line at the sidewalk, including corner conditions.

3. Building facades shall be generally parallel to front property lines. All buildings shall front onto a public street. All ground floor residential units with exterior access shall front a public street, unless specifically exempted by one of the provisions of Section 8.1.

4. Parking shall be located to the rear of the building.

5. Points of permitted access to the parking indicated by arrows.

6. Hedges, garden walls, or fences may be built on property lines or as the continuation of building walls. A garden wall, fence, or hedge (min. 3’ in height) shall be installed along any street frontage adjacent to parking areas.

7. Trash containers shall be located in the rear parking area (see Parking Regulations).

8.Mechanical and utility equipment at ground level shall be placed in the side or rear yard and shall be screened from view by opaque screening from grade level along any public street or adjacent property (Article 7.6.2). Buildings that front on more than one public street may have mechanical and utility equipment located within a street facing yard, provided it is visually screened using compatible building materials and design as the principle structure. This is applicable only where no other reasonable option exists as determined by the Administrator. Examples of features limiting the
location of mechanical and utility equipment may include, but not
limited to, the physical layout of existing building, the presence of
easements, elevation changes, etc.
 1. For buildings set back from sidewalk, balconies, stoops, stairs, open porches, bay windows, and awnings are permitted to encroach into setback area up to 8’.

2. Attached decks are permitted to encroach into the rear setback up to 15 feet.

3. For buildings set up to the sidewalk, upper level balconies, bay windows and their supports at ground level may encroach a maximum of 5’0” over the sidewalk.

4. Main pedestrian access to the building and to individual units is from the street (indicated by larger arrow), unless specifically exempted by one of the provisions of Section 8.1. Secondary access may be from parking areas (indicated by smaller arrow).

Special Conditions:
1. The intention of buildings in all locations must be to relate the principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street.

2. Corners: Setback at street corners will generally replicate frontage conditions. However, side setbacks on a minor street may be less than the front dimension.

3. Within the limits described, front and side setbacks will vary depending upon site conditions. Setbacks should be used in a manner which encourages pedestrian activity. Squares or spatially defined plazas within building setback areas can act as focal points for pedestrians.

Description:
The apartment building is a residential building accommodating several households. In traditional towns, this building type coexists with a variety of other building types. A successful contemporary design permits its integration with other residential types through the coordination of site and building design (see Architectural Regulations). Apartment complexes should be one or more separated buildings similar in their scale on the public street to large detached housing. Where possible, structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood.

Building Type / Apartment Building

 Permitted Height and Uses  Architectural Standards
 



1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves or the highest level of a flat roof.

2. The height of parapet walls may vary depending upon the need to screen mechanical equipment.

3. Building height to the ridge may vary depending on the roof pitch.

4. Permitted uses are indicated above.
Principles


A. To perpetuate the unique building character of the town and its environs, and to re-establish its local identity, development shall generally employ building types that are sympathetic to the historic architectural vocabulary of the area in their massing and external materials.

B. The front elevations facing the street, and the overall massing shall communicate an emphasis on the human scale and the pedestrian environment.

C. Each building should be designed to form part of a larger composition of the area in which it is situated. Adjacent buildings should thus be of similar scale, height, and configuration.

D. Building silhouettes should be generally consistent. The scale and pitch of roof lines should thus be similar across groups of buildings.

E. Porches should form a predominant motif of house designs, and be located on the front or to the side of the dwelling. When attached to the front, they should extend over at least 15% of the front facade. All porches should be constructed of materials in keeping with those of the main building.

F. Front loaded garages, if provided, shall meet the standards of Section 8.16.

G. At a minimum, the Americans with Disabilities Act standards for accessibility shall be met.

Configurations
A. Main roofs on residential buildings shall be symmetrical gables or hips with a pitch of between 4:12 and 12:12. Monopitch (shed) roofs are allowed only if they are attached to the wall of the main building. No monopitch shall be less than 4:12. All accessory buildings shall have roof pitches that conform to those of the main building.

B. Balconies should generally be simply supported by posts and beams. The support of cantilevered balconies should be assisted by visible brackets.

C. Two wall materials may be combined horizontally on one facade. The “heavier” material should be below.

D. Exterior chimneys should be finished in brick or stucco.

Techniques
A. Overhanging eaves may expose rafters.

B. Flush eaves should be finished by profiled molding or gutters.


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ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR DETACHED HOUSE

Lot Types / Detached House


 Building Placement/Parking/Vehicle Access Building Placement/Parking/Vehicle Access 
   
 1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within zone represented by the hatched area except in R & TR zones, where min.front setbacks are 25’ & 20' respectively.

Along new streets, the build-to line shall be a minimum of 10’ behind street ROW.

Along existing streets, front build-to lines of new buildings shall be equal to the average setbacks of existing buildings on the same side of the street within 300’. Where the average setback of existing buildings within 300’ exceeds 50’ the setback of any new building may vary up to 20’ from the setback of an adjacent building, existing or proposed, in order to negotiate a gradual transition to a different building setback. Only in the most exceptional circumstances having to do with extreme topography or very special design composition may these rules of residential building placement be varied.

2. Garages may be detached (entered from front or rear), or attached to the main dwelling, with or without habitable rooms above. Front loaded garages, if provided, shall meet the standards of Section 8.16.

3. A detached garage may be located only in the rear yard.

4. Points of permitted front or rear access to parking indicated by arrows. On corner lots, sideyard access is also permitted.

5. Main pedestrian access to the building is from the street. Secondary access may be from parking areas.

6. For buildings set back from the sidewalk, balconies, stoops, stairs, open porches, bay windows, and, and awnings are permitted to encroach into the front setback area up to 8’.

7. Sideyard setback is 12’ in the R zone & 6 ’ in the TR zone.

8. Mechanical equipment shall not encroach into any required setback.

Description:
The detached house may coexist with other, similarly scaled buildings along town streets. When other building types are integrated with the detached house, the scale of the detached house type and lot shall control. Civic buildings, however, may exceed the scale of the detached house. Where possible, structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood.
 1. Generally, buildings shall be placed on the lot within zone represented by the hatched area. The build-to line will range from 0’ to 10’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as extreme topography may require a larger setback. Sideyard houses are not permitted on in-fill sites abutting existing all-yard houses.

2. A detached garage may be located only in the rear yard. Attached garages are not permitted on sideyard houses.

3. Points of permitted rear access to parking indicated by arrow.

4. Main pedestrian access to the building is from the street. Secondary access may be from parking areas.

5. For buildings set up to the sidewalk, balconies and upper level bay windows may encroach over the sidewalk up to 5’.

6. For buildings set back from the sidewalk, balconies, stoops, stairs, open porches, bay windows, and, and awnings are permitted to encroach into the front setback area up to 8’.

7. Commercial Use in a Detached House (NR District) shall comply with the following:
a. Parking shall be located in the side or rear yards only. If provided in the side yards, the parking area shall not exceed 25% of the frontage line and shall not be in the yards adjacent to a street.

b.Parking areas on adjacent mixed use lot shall be connected whenever practical.

c. Trash containers shall be located in the rear yard. If adjacent to existing single-family residential uses, trash containers shall be limited to residential rollout containers only (no dumpsters).

d. Mechanical equipment at ground level shall be placed on the parking lot side of the building away from buildings on adjacent sites and shall be screened from view by an opaque screen.

Special Conditions:

1. The intention of buildings in all locations must be to relate the principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street.

2. Corners: Setback at street corners will generally replicate frontage conditions. However, side setbacks on a minor street may be less than the front dimension.

3. Within the limits described, these regulations apply to all houses built on public streets. For detached homes on large lots accessed by a private drive in Rural Neighborhoods, building placement and site planning will be dictated by landscape features and landscape preservation.

Building Type / Detached House

 Permitted Height/Uses/Encroachments
 


1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves.

2. Building height of main dwelling to ridge may vary depending on the roof pitch.

3. Permitted uses are indicated above.

4. Maximum footprint for a building housing a detached accessory dwelling is 650 square feet or 50% of first floor area of principal residence, whichever is greater.

5. Balconies, stoops, stairs, open porches, bay windows, and awnings are permitted to encroach into setback area up to 8’.

6. Decks, balconies, and porches are permitted to encroach into the rear yard setback as provided in Section 8.8.9.


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ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR ATTACHED HOUSE

Lot Type / Attached House

 Building Placement/Parking/Vehicle Access  Encroachment/Pedestrian Access
   
 1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within zone represented by the hatched area.

2. Along new streets, the build-to line will range from 10’ to 25’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as topography or lot widths permit a larger setback. Along existing streets, front build-to lines shall typically be equal to the average setbacks for buildings on the same side of the street within 300 feet. However, in more urban conditions, dwellings may be set up to the property line at the sidewalk.

3. Building facades shall be generally parallel to front property lines. All buildings shall front onto a public street.

4. Front loaded garages, if provided, shall meet the standards of Section 8.16.

5. Points of permitted access to parking indicated by arrows.
 1. For buildings set up to the sidewalk, balconies and upper level bay windows are permitted to encroach over the sidewalk area up to 5’.

2. For buildings set back from sidewalk, balconies, stoops, stairs, open porches, bay windows, and awnings are permitted to encroach into the front setback area up to 8’.

3. Main pedestrian access to the building is from the street (indicated by larger arrow). Secondary access may be from parking areas (indicated by smaller arrow).

4. Decks must be constructed only in an established rear yard and are permitted to encroach into the rear setback up to 15’.
 Description:
The attached house is a rowhouse, a townhouse, or a duplex. Traditional southern homes in Savannah and Charleston provide the historic model. Dilworth Crescent in Charlotte provides a good contemporary example. Generally, building plans will have narrow frontages with the plan depth being greater than its width. Where possible, structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood.
 Special Conditions:
1. The intention of buildings in all locations must be to relate the principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street.

2. Corners: Setback at street corners will generally replicate frontage conditions. However, side setbacks on a minor street may be less than the front dimension.

3. Front and side setbacks will vary depending upon site conditions. Setbacks should be used in a manner which encourages pedestrian activity.

Building Type / Attached House

 Permitted Height and Uses
 



1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves.

2. Building height to ridge will vary depending upon the roof pitch.

3. Permitted uses are indicated above.

4. Maximum footprint for a building housing a detached accessory dwelling is 650 square feet.

5. Mechanical equipment shall not encroach into any required setback.


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ARTICLE 4: LOT AND BUILDING TYPE FOR CIVIC BUILDING

Lot Type / Civic Building

 Building Placement/Parking/Vehicle Access  Encroachment/Pedestrian Access
   
 1. Buildings shall be placed on the lot within the zone represented by the hatched area. In most cases, the build-to line will range from 0’ to 25’ behind street ROW. Special site conditions such as topography, lot width, or provision of a green or plaza will permit a larger building setback.

2. Parking shall be located to the rear of the building; sideyard parking shall occupy no more than 25% of the primary frontage line and shall not be placed in any sideyard abutting an intersecting street. Where dimensions of existing lots restrict parking behind buildings, the limitations on sideyard parking may be modified.

3. A planting strip or defined plaza should be provided to relate the building to the street.

4. Generally, building and street facades must extend parallel to frontage property lines.

5. Points of permitted access to the parking indicated by arrows.

6. Hedges, garden walls, or fences may be built on property lines or as the continuation of building walls. A garden wall, fence, or hedge (min. 3’ in height) shall be installed along any street frontage adjacent to parking areas.

7. Parking areas on adjacent lots should be connected.

8. Trash containers shall be located in the parking area (see Parking Regulations).

9. Mechanical and utility equipment at ground level shall be placed in the side or rear yard and shall be screened from view by opaque screening from grade level along any public street or adjacent property (Article 7.6.2). Buildings that front on more than one public street may have mechanical and utility equipment located within a street facing yard, provided it is visually screened using compatible building materials and design as the principle structure. This is applicable only where no other reasonable option exists as determined by the Administrator. Examples of features limiting the
location of mechanical and utility equipment may include, but not
limited to, the physical layout of existing building, the presence of
easements, elevation changes, etc.
 1. For buildings set up to the sidewalk, upper level balconies, bay windows and their supports may encroach a maximum of 5’0” over the sidewalk.

2. For buildings set back from the sidewalk, balconies, stoops stairs, open porches, bay windows, and awnings are permitted to encroach into front setback area up to 8’.

3. Main pedestrian access to the building is from the street (indicated by larger arrow). Secondary access may be from parking areas (indicated by smaller arrow).

Description:
A civic building is a building used for purposes that are public in nature (e.g. schools, libraries, government buildings, and churches). These buildings must be designed to take their appropriate places within neighborhoods as integral parts of the community. It is expected that the scale and architectural sophistication of these buildings will match their civic importance. Where possible, civic structures shall be designed to terminate vistas or serve as key focal points in the neighborhood. The intention of buildings in all locations must be to relate the principal facade to the sidewalk and public space of the street. Civic buildings shall not be set back on the lot behind a standard parking lot; however, a plaza may be used for occasional parking.

Building Type / Civic Building

 Permitted Height and Uses  Architectural Standards





1. Building height shall be measured as the vertical distance from the highest finished grade relative to the street frontage, up to the eaves or the highest level of a flat roof.

2. The height of parapet walls may vary depending upon the need to screen mechanical equipment.

3. Maximum height of buildings shall be 4 stories. Building must comply with compatibility of surrounding development as found in applicable zoning district.

4. Permitted uses are indicated above and are further regulated by zoning district standards.
 Principles
A. To perpetuate the unique building character of the town and its environs, and to re-establish its local identity, development shall generally employ building types that are sympathetic to the historic architectural vocabulary of the area in their massing and external materials.

B. Building elevations fronting or visible from public streets shall be clad with masonry, wood, vinyl siding, stucco, or similar material. Metal paneling may not comprise a street fronting building face.

C. The front elevations facing the street, and the overall massing shall communicate a emphasis on the human scale and the pedestrian environment.

D. Each building should be designed to form part of a larger composition of the area in which it is situated.

E. Trailers (mobile units) shall not be used as permanent civic buildings.

F. Schools, churches, and government buildings shall be built so that they terminate a street vista whenever possible, and shall be of sufficient design quality to create visual anchors for the community.

Configurations
A. Street level windows should be untinted. Tinted glass with a minimum visual transmittance factor of 35 is permitted. Mirrored or reflective glass is not permitted in any location. Clear textured glass is allowed in restrooms with windows. Stained glass or decorative art glass is permitted.

B. Flat roof lines are allowed.

C. The orders, if provided, should have proportions and moldings according to The American Vignola.

Techniques
A. Windows should be set to the inside of the building face wall.

B. All rooftop equipment shall be enclosed in building material that shall be enclosed in building material that matches the structure or is visually compatible with the structure.

C. Windows shall be of square or vertical proportion. Special windows may be circular or regular polygons.

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